Solving Residential Drainage Problems

Drainage problems are quite a nuisance for many homeowners in the Bay Area. Flooded basements, garages, and water in crawlspaces and in finished spaces under homes are commonplace. Most people don’t know where to start to solve these problems, or worse yet may have had prior drainage work done that was either inadequate or in some cases actually made their problems worse. A basic understanding of drainage fundamentals may help homeowners make better decisions regarding future drainage work.

Drainage ABC’s

One of the most important things to understand is that there are two types of water that need to be managed- surface water and subterranean water. Surface water is water from roofs, downspouts, patio drains, and water that runs along driveways, walkways, etc. Surface water is primarily rainwater and causes problems during and shortly after it rains. Subterranean water comes from underground creeks and springs, irrigation lines and leaky pipes, or a high water table. Tree roots and fissures in the soil create conduits for water as well. This water is more difficult to manage because it is often not possible to determine its exact source or depth, or in what direction the water is traveling when it encounters your home. It often appears long after a storm and is sometimes present throughout the rainy season or even year-round. Subterranean water is a big problem for many hillside dwellings in our community. This is especially true in older homes where the concrete foundations are porous, shallow or may have some settlement and cracking, allowing for easier water infiltration.

The Correct Solution

To properly solve your drainage problems one must consider both types of water. When we suspect that subterranean water is contributing to a drainage problem, we will often install a subsurface drain (commonly known as a French Drain) in conjunction with our surface drainage. When we install drainage next to a foundation, we will also attach a waterproofing membrane to that wall. This acts as a secondary barrier against water and protects the concrete against further degradation from moisture. The water is then piped to the street under the sidewalk and through the curb either via gravity, or with a sump pump when the house is below the street level. Most building departments prefer that the water is not directed into your yard because it may end up in your neighbor’s yard if it is not properly absorbed into the ground.

Don’t Be Fooled

French Drains are commonly around 3′-5′ deep, but are occasionally much deeper. Substantial amounts of soil have to be removed and replaced with gravel as part of this process. This type of work is not cheap- it is certainly more expensive and involved than surface drainage. Yet it is sometimes the only way (and is often the best way) to keep a crawlspace, garage, or basement space dry while at the same time protecting adjacent foundations from moisture. Improperly designed or shallow drains can sometimes exaggerate the drainage problems and make them worse. It is best to consult with a contractor or engineer who has substantial experience with this type of work before embarking on drainage repairs. A properly designed and constructed drainage system should take care of your water problems and protect your home well into the future.

Written by Jim Gardner of Jim Gardner Construction Inc., a contractor, Piedmont resident, and specialist in residential foundations, drainage, and structural repair

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